SARAHHESS101@gmail.com are you there?

THIS IS JUST LITTLE OLE ME

 

I am just me.  down to earth country lovin strong county boy.  Too dumb to come out the rain when the hogs were calling.  How is this mama?  Just little ole me.  I say.  Off to school.  ash can filled with me.  Covered with sweat by day damp by night.  No wonder I had pneumonia twice the same year.  Sarah you know I love you.

Writer

 

I love to draw and write.  Illustrate and write kid books.  Wiki you’ll have to wait your turn.  I know this is you you know me by thunderlane125.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Jump to: navigation, search

 

 

For other uses, see Writer (disambiguation).

“Wordsmith” redirects here. For other uses, see Wordsmith (disambiguation).

This article is about writers who use words. For writers of music, see Composer.

Writer

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes – Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos.jpg
Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos, a Spanish writer depicted with the tools of the trade.
Occupation

 

 

Activity sectors
Literature

Description

 

Competencies
Language proficiency, grammar, literacy

 

Related jobs
Journalist, novelist, poet

A writer is a person who uses written words in various styles and techniques to communicate their ideas. Writers produce various forms of literary art and creative writing such as novels, short stories, poetry, plays, screenplays, and essays as well as various reports and news articles that may be of interest to the public. Writers’ texts are published across a range of media. Skilled writers who are able to use language to express ideas well often contribute significantly to the cultural content of a society.[1] The word is also used elsewhere in the arts – such as songwriter – but as a standalone term, “writer” normally refers to the creation of written language. Some writers work from an oral tradition.

Writers can produce material across a number of genres, fictional or non-fictional. Other writers use multiple media – for example, graphics or illustration – to enhance the communication of their ideas. Another recent demand has been created by civil and government readers for the work of non-fictional technical writers, whose skills create understandable, interpretive documents of a practical or scientific nature. Some writers may use images (drawing, painting, graphics) or multimedia to augment their writing. In rare instances, creative writers are able to communicate their ideas via music as well as words.[2]

As well as producing their own written works, writers often write on how they write (that is, the process they use);[3] why they write (that is, their motivation);[4] and also comment on the work of other writers (criticism).[5] Writers work professionally or non-professionally, that is, for payment or without payment and may be paid either in advance (or on acceptance), or only after their work is published. Payment is only one of the motivations of writers and many are never paid for their work. [check quotation syntax] The term writer is often used as a synonym of author, although the latter term has a somewhat broader meaning and is used to convey legal responsibility for a piece of writing, even if its composition is anonymous, unknown or collaborative.

 

 

Contents  [hide]
1 Types 1.1 Literary and creative

 

 

1.2 Performative

 

 

 

1.3 Interpretive and academic

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.4 Reportage

 

 

 

1.5 Utilitarian

 

 

 

 

2 Process and methods 2.1 Writing process

 

 

 

2.2 Motivations

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 Authorship 3.1 Pen names
3.2 Fictional writers
3.3 Writers of sacred texts

4 Controversial writing 4.1 Punishment

5 Protection and representation
6 Awards
7 See also
8 References
9 External links

Types[edit]

Writers choose from a range of literary genres to express their ideas. Most writing can be adapted for use in another medium. For example, a writer’s work may be read privately or recited or performed in a play or film. Satire for example, may be written as a poem, an essay, a film, a comic play, or a piece of journalism. The writer of a letter may include elements of criticism, biography, or journalism.

Many writers work across genres. The genre sets the parameters but all kinds of creative adaptation have been attempted: novel to film; poem to play; history to musical. Writers may begin their career in one genre and change to another. For example, historian William Dalrymple began in the genre of travel literature and also writes as a journalist. Many writers have produced both fiction and non-fiction works and others write in a genre that crosses the two. For example, writers of historical romances, such as Georgette Heyer, invent characters and stories set in historical periods. In this genre, the accuracy of the history and the level of factual detail in the work both tend to be debated. Some writers write both creative fiction and serious analysis, sometimes using different names to separate their work. Dorothy Sayers, for example, wrote crime fiction but was also a playwright, essayist, translator, and critic.

Literary and creative[edit]

 

 

 

Alexander Pushkin recites his poem before Gavrila Derzhavin (1815)
Poet[edit]
Writer

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Jump to: navigation, search

 

 

For other uses, see Writer (disambiguation).

“Wordsmith” redirects here. For other uses, see Wordsmith (disambiguation).

This article is about writers who use words. For writers of music, see Composer.

Writer

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes – Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos.jpg
Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos, a Spanish writer depicted with the tools of the trade.
Occupation

 

 

Activity sectors
Literature

Description

 

Competencies
Language proficiency, grammar, literacy

 

Related jobs
Journalist, novelist, poet

A writer is a person who uses written words in various styles and techniques to communicate their ideas. Writers produce various forms of literary art and creative writing such as novels, short stories, poetry, plays, screenplays, and essays as well as various reports and news articles that may be of interest to the public. Writers’ texts are published across a range of media. Skilled writers who are able to use language to express ideas well often contribute significantly to the cultural content of a society.[1] The word is also used elsewhere in the arts – such as songwriter – but as a standalone term, “writer” normally refers to the creation of written language. Some writers work from an oral tradition.

Writers can produce material across a number of genres, fictional or non-fictional. Other writers use multiple media – for example, graphics or illustration – to enhance the communication of their ideas. Another recent demand has been created by civil and government readers for the work of non-fictional technical writers, whose skills create understandable, interpretive documents of a practical or scientific nature. Some writers may use images (drawing, painting, graphics) or multimedia to augment their writing. In rare instances, creative writers are able to communicate their ideas via music as well as words.[2]

As well as producing their own written works, writers often write on how they write (that is, the process they use);[3] why they write (that is, their motivation);[4] and also comment on the work of other writers (criticism).[5] Writers work professionally or non-professionally, that is, for payment or without payment and may be paid either in advance (or on acceptance), or only after their work is published. Payment is only one of the motivations of writers and many are never paid for their work. [check quotation syntax] The term writer is often used as a synonym of author, although the latter term has a somewhat broader meaning and is used to convey legal responsibility for a piece of writing, even if its composition is anonymous, unknown or collaborative.

 

 

Contents  [hide]
1 Types 1.1 Literary and creative

 

 

1.2 Performative

 

 

 

1.3 Interpretive and academic

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.4 Reportage

 

 

 

1.5 Utilitarian

 

 

 

 

2 Process and methods 2.1 Writing process

 

 

 

2.2 Motivations

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 Authorship 3.1 Pen names
3.2 Fictional writers
3.3 Writers of sacred texts

4 Controversial writing 4.1 Punishment

5 Protection and representation
6 Awards
7 See also
8 References
9 External links

Types[edit]

Writers choose from a range of literary genres to express their ideas. Most writing can be adapted for use in another medium. For example, a writer’s work may be read privately or recited or performed in a play or film. Satire for example, may be written as a poem, an essay, a film, a comic play, or a piece of journalism. The writer of a letter may include elements of criticism, biography, or journalism.

Many writers work across genres. The genre sets the parameters but all kinds of creative adaptation have been attempted: novel to film; poem to play; history to musical. Writers may begin their career in one genre and change to another. For example, historian William Dalrymple began in the genre of travel literature and also writes as a journalist. Many writers have produced both fiction and non-fiction works and others write in a genre that crosses the two. For example, writers of historical romances, such as Georgette Heyer, invent characters and stories set in historical periods. In this genre, the accuracy of the history and the level of factual detail in the work both tend to be debated. Some writers write both creative fiction and serious analysis, sometimes using different names to separate their work. Dorothy Sayers, for example, wrote crime fiction but was also a playwright, essayist, translator, and critic.

Literary and creative[edit]

 

 

 

Alexander Pushkin recites his poem before Gavrila Derzhavin (1815)
Poet[edit]

Main article: Poet
Main article: Poet

 

 

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