Internet Literature

Archive for the ‘Writing’ Category

Boris Pasternak: “All mothers are mothers of great people, and it is not their fault that life later disappoints them”

Boris Pasternak

According to Boris Pasternak, the Russian poet, novelist and literary translator who was born today in history, 10 February, 1890:

“All mothers are mothers of great people, and it is not their fault that life later disappoints them.”

Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and literary translator, was born today in history: 10 February, 1890

Pasternak at the first Congress of the Union of Soviet Writers in 1934.

Boris Leonidovich Pasternak (/ˈpæstərˌnæk/Russian: Бори́с Леони́дович Пастерна́к; IPA: [bɐˈrʲis lʲɪɐˈnʲidəvʲɪtɕ pəstʲɪrˈnak]; 10 February [O.S. 29 January] 1890 – 30 May 1960) was a Russian poet, novelist, and literary translator. In his native Russia, Pasternak’s first book of poems, My Sister, Life (1917), is one of the most influential collections ever published in the Russian language. Pasternak’s translations of stage plays by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Friedrich Schiller, Pedro Calderón de la Barca, and William Shakespeare remain very popular with Russian audiences.

Outside Russia, Pasternak is best known as the author of Doctor Zhivago (1958), a novel which takes place between the Russian Revolution of 1905 and the Second World War. Due to the novel’s independent-minded stance on the socialist state, Doctor Zhivago was rejected for publication in the USSR. At the instigation of Giangiacomo Feltrinelli, Doctor Zhivago was smuggled to Milan and published in 1957. Pasternak was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1958, an event which both humiliated and enraged the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, which forced him to decline the prize, though his descendants were later to accept it in his name in 1988.

Fleur Adcock reads her poem, Strangers on a Tram

Fleur Adcock

Fleur Adcock, the New Zealand poet and editor who was born today in history, 10 February, 1934, reads her poem, Strangers on a Tram.

Fleur Adcock, New Zealand poet and editor, was born today in history: 10 February, 1934

Fleur Adcock

Fleur Adcock, CNZM, OBE (born 10 February 1934) is a New Zealand poet and editor, of English and Northern Irish ancestry, who has lived much of her life in England.

Jules Michelet: “He who knows how to be poor knows everything”

Jules Michelet

According to Jules Michelet, the French historian who died today in history, 09 February, 1874:

“He who knows how to be poor knows everything.”

Patricia Cornwell

Featuredphoto
Untitled

Flesh And Blood (2014)

It’s Dr. Kay Scarpetta’s birthday, and she’s about to head to Miami for a vacation with Benton Wesley, her FBI profiler husband, when she notices seven pennies on a wall behind their Cambridge house. Is this a kids’ game? If so, why are all of the coins dated 1981 and so shiny they could be newly minted? Her cellphone rings, and Detective Pete Marino tells her there’s been a homicide five minutes away. A high school music teacher has been shot with uncanny precision as he unloaded groceries from his car. No one has heard or seen a thing.

In this 22nd Scarpetta novel, the master forensic sleuth finds herself in the unsettling pursuit… Read More >

Flesh And Blood Back Stage Video

NEWS

The 50 Best First Sentences in Fiction

In a 2013 interview with Joe Fassler, horror fiction maestro Stephen King reflected on the magnitude of a novel’s introductory sentence. “An opening line should invite the reader to begin the story,” he said. “It should say: … Read More >

Book review: Cornwell’s Kay Scarpetta is back on the case

Patricia Cornwell is at the top of her form. Yes, the text is loaded with forensic information on autopsies, guns, bullets and the trajectories of a sharp-shooting sniper’s aim as well as bureaucratic infighting, feuds, fra… Read More >

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s